Coffeeshop Culture

The first coffee shop can be traced back to the 17th century in Oxford, England. It was a place for college professors to meet with students. Today’s coffee shops are becoming much more than meeting spots. People use them as workspaces, to hold meetings, or hang with friends. In fact, the best-selling book series, “Harry Potter” was written in a coffee shop. We take a look at the culture of the modern-day coffee shop and find out the “science” behind why many people are spending their days inside of them.

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In this segment:

Liza Noland, Amy Aranyosi, Steve Kraus, Julia Peixoto-Peters, Alex Halavais

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