Celebrating 100 years since women first casted their votes

This month marks the 100-year anniversary of the 19th-amendment, which gave women the right to vote. We spoke with Arizona Senate President, Karen Fann and Arizona House Minority leader, Charlene Fernandez to get their thoughts on this milestone of women’s suffrage.

On August 18, 1920, congress ratified the 19th amendment to give women the right to vote. The movement which began in the 1800s had women organizing, petitioning, and picketing for the right to vote. In 1848 the movement launched on a national level at the Seneca Falls Convention. From there the demand for the vote became a key piece of the women’s rights movement. Now 100 years later women have not only made their voices heard in the polls, but in elected offices.

According to a Rutgers study done in 2o19, 38.9% of women made up the Arizona State Legislature. The study had Arizona ranked #6 for the most female representation.

Furthermore, Fann and Fernandez are hopeful that more women will run for office and make their voices heard.

 

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In this segment:

Senate President Karen Fann and House Minority leader Charlene Fernandez

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