The Civic Discourse Project: “Citizenship and Civic Leadership in America”

Writer Rich Lowry, editor of National Review “Nationalism and America,” visited Arizona State University’s Tempe campus to participate in the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership’s lecture series. Lowry discusses the differences between patriotism and nationalism. Although many people believe that patriotism is being proud of where you’re from and nationalism is “everything wrong with that,” Lowry disagrees with this assessment.

Political scientist Yascha Mounk from Johns Hopkins University: “The Decline of Democracy: Standing Up for Liberal, Democratic Values” joins the discussion on nationalism and inclusivity. Despite the background of nationalism, Mounk believes nationalism is the most powerful political tool to bring people together.

The School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership’s Civic Discourse provides an indispensable forum for the school to include historical and contemporary conversations about economic opportunities in American society within the framework of civic discourse that inspires all of our public programs.

MORE: Read about the latest season of The Civic Discourse Project or see all this season’s episodes.

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