Phoenix Symphony celebrates 70th anniversary


TED SIMONS: "ARIZONA HORIZON" MADE POSSIBLE BY CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE FRIENDS OF PBS. THANK YOU.
TED SIMONS: THE RESCISSION OF DACA, WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO EMPLOYERS?

MATTHEW THOMAS: IT WILL HAVE A NEGATIVE IMPACT ACROSS THE COUNTRY IN A WIDE VARIETY OF INDUSTRIES. THE GOVERNMENT IS REQUIRING THEM TO OR FORCING THEM TO LAY OFF SOME OF THEIR BEST AND MOST PRODUCTIVE WORKERS BASED ON AN ARBITRARY CHANGE IN POLICY.

TED SIMONS: INDUSTRIES HIT THE HARDEST, WHAT DO YOU SEE OUT THERE?

MATTHEW THOMAS: DACA IS ACROSS A WIDE VARIETY OF INDUSTRIES. THERE ARE THOSE THAT ARE MORE EDUCATED. YOU MAY HAVE THOSE IN HIGH-TECH CAREERS, PEOPLE IN MEDICAL SCHOOL. YOU HAVE PEOPLE IN LOW-SKILLED FIELDS AS WELL. SOME OF THE CONCERNS, THERE ARE A LOT OF INDUSTRIES WITH A WORKER SHORTAGE, HEALTHCARE INDUSTRIES, HERE IN ARIZONA, A TEACHER SHORTAGE AND A SHORTAGE IN CONSTRUCTION WORKERS. THOSE AREAS WOULD BE IMPACTED SHOULD THEY RESCIND THIS.

TED SIMONS: THOSE PEOPLE WILL BE LAID OFF AS THEIR PERMITS EXPIRE, CORRECT?

MATTHEW THOMAS: CORRECT. THERE ARE PEOPLE THAT MAY BE LUCKY ENOUGH TO RENEW THE DACA PERMIT TO HAVE THE FULL TWO YEAR, BUT STARTING MARCH 5TH WHEN THE PROGRAM IS NOT GOING TO RENEW ANYMORE, THEY'LL HAVE TO LAY OFF PEOPLE LITTLE BY LITTLE AS THEIR PERMITS EXPIRE.

TED SIMONS: IF YOUR PERMIT EXPIRES BEFORE MARCH 5TH, YOU HAVE UNTIL OCTOBER, SOMETHING ALONG THOSE LINES?

MATTHEW THOMAS: BETWEEN SEPTEMBER 1ST OR 5TH AND MARCH 5TH, IF YOU ARE IN THAT WINDOW OF TIME WITH EXPIRATION, YOU HAVE TO FILE FOR RENEWAL BY OCTOBER 5TH. IF PEOPLE FORGOT TO RENEW OR THE DATE HAPPENS TO BE MARCH 6TH, THEY'LL BE OUT OF LUCK.

TED SIMONS: I IMAGINE EMPLOYER, IF THEY WANT TO KEEP THE WORKERS AROUND WOULD BE ENCOURAGING EMPLOYEES TO GET THE RENEWAL PROCESS GOING. CAN YOU DO THAT? IS IT DISCRIMINATORY TO SAY, ARE YOU A DACA RECIPIENT?

MATTHEW THOMAS: THEY HAVE TO WALK WITH A BIT OF CAUTION WITH THAT. THEY CAN'T NECESSARILY ASK INDIVIDUALLY IF THEY HAVE DACA STATUS. THEY CAN'T LAY PEOPLE OFF BECAUSE THEY HAVE DACA STATUS, BUT EMPLOYERS HAVE AN OBLIGATION TO MAKE SURE PEOPLE WITH WORK PERMITS HAVE AN UNEXPIRED WORK PERMIT WHILE EMPLOYED. THE HUMAN RESOURCE DEPARTMENT SHOULD BE AWARE OF WHO IS ON DACA. IF NOT, IT MAY BE TIME TO AUDIT. THEY SHOULDN'T GO AROUND ASKING. THEY NEED TO TREAD LIGHTLY THERE AS WELL.

TED SIMONS: COULD THIS BE A GUEST PERMIT? DO THEY QUALIFY FOR THAT?

MATTHEW THOMAS: MANY OF THE EMPLOYMENT BASED VISAS, THEY HAVE STRICTER RULES YOU SEE IN OTHER TYPE OF VISAS, AND YOU GENERALLY CAN'T BE LIVING IN THE UNITED STATES WITHOUT STATUS AS THESE INDIVIDUALS WOULD BE. THAT WOULD NOT BE AN OPTION FOR THEM FOR EMPLOYERS TO PETITION SOMEONE FOR H1B.

TED SIMONS: DOES IT MAKE SENSE FOR A NEW LAW TO INCLUDE THAT OPTION?

MATTHEW THOMAS: IT COULD BE A POTENTIAL OPTION BUT H1B ARE NON-IMMIGRANT VISAS. THEY HAVE AN OBLIGATION TO SHOW THAT THEIR INTENTION TO COME HERE TO WORK WOULD BE TEMPORARY AND THEY WOULD EVENTUALLY GO BACK TO THEIR COUNTRY.

TED SIMONS: YOU HAVE A DACA RECIPIENT AT YOUR FIRM, IS THAT CORRECT?

MATTHEW THOMAS: YES, THAT'S CORRECT.

TED SIMONS: HOW DID YOU FIND OUT?

MATTHEW THOMAS: WE FILLED OUT THE W9 PROCESS. WE ARE LOOKING FOR THE BEST AND MOST QUALIFIED FOR THE POSITION. WE CAN'T SPECIFICALLY LOOK FOR SOMEONE ON DACA AS WE CAN'T LOOK FOR SOMEONE WITH U.S. CITIZEN STATUS. THAT WOULD BE DISCRIMINATORY. I HIRED THE BEST FOR THE POSITION AND FOUND OUT LATER SHE HAD DACA.

TED SIMONS: THERE ARE PEOPLE THAT SAY FALSE INFORMATION MIGHT HAVE BEEN USED TO GAIN THE POSITION. DOES THAT CONCERN YOU?

MATTHEW THOMAS: WITH DACA, FOR THIS PARTICULAR -- MOST PEOPLE ON DACA DON'T GET A SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER UNTIL THEY GET THE WORK PERMIT. THERE MAY BE PEOPLE OLDER WHO HAVE WORKED IN THE UNITED STATES WITH A MADEUP OR STOLEN SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER, BUT I THINK THE MAJORITY OF PEOPLE ON DACA ARE NOT IN THAT STATUS INCLUDING MY EMPLOYEE. SHE GOT THE SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER IF THE DACA PROCESS.

TED SIMONS: SOME PEOPLE HEAR ABOUT THIS AND SAY FALSE IDENTITIES OUT THERE. THAT HAS TO BE A CONCERN FOR THE EMPLOYER. GO AHEAD, PLEASE.

MATTHEW THOMAS: THIS ACTUALLY ELIMINATES A LOT OF THAT CONCERN. THESE PEOPLE ARE ABLE TO GET REAL WORK PERMITS AND SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBERS. YOU DON'T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT THE PARTICULAR RISK OF SOMEONE WHO ISN'T USING A SOCIAL THEY KNOW OF. A LOT OF TIMES THEY MAKE IT UP. IT CAN BE CONNECTED TO AN INDIVIDUAL. WITH DACA, THE WORRIES OF IDENTITY THEFT ARE ELIMINATED.

TED SIMONS: CONCERNS THAT PEOPLE HAVE WITH UNDOCUMENTED FOLKS, THEY ARE TAKING JOBS THAT AMERICANS CAN DO AND THEY ARE NOT GETTING IN LINE LIKE THOSE TRYING TO GO THROUGH THE PROCESS THE PROPER WAY. RESPOND, PLEASE?

MATTHEW THOMAS: I CERTAINLY UNDERSTAND THEIR CONCERNS. THERE IS A LOT OF DEBATE ABOUT THAT ISSUE. I KNOW THAT'S SOMETHING JEFF SESSIONS BROUGHT UP IN HIS ANNOUNCEMENT ABOUT THE RESCISSIONS. I LOOKED AT AN ARTICLE ABOUT THAT. IT'S DIFFICULT TO SAY IF THESE PEOPLE TOOK A JOB AWAY FROM AMERICAN CITIZENS, ESPECIALLY WHEN YOU CONSIDER MANY DACA PEOPLE ARE WORKING IN AREAS WHERE THERE IS SHORTAGE SUCH AS TEACHING AND NURSING AND CONSTRUCTION. WE HAVE A VERY LOW UNEMPLOYMENT RATE RIGHT NOW. IT'S DIFFICULT TO SAY IF DACA PEOPLE ARE TAKING AWAY JOBS. HAVING THEM EMPLOYED, THEY CAN BE CREATING JOBS. THEY ARE PART OF THE ECONOMY AND CONSUMERS AN MAY ALLOW OTHER BUSINESSES TO GROW.

TED SIMONS: GOOD TO HAVE YOU. HERE. APPRECIATE IT.

TITO MUNOZ: HOPEFULLY, WE HAVE TAMED OURSELVES DOWN. IT'S A WONDERFUL PIECE, A MONUMENTAL PIECE. IT'S FITTING FOR AN OPENING.

TED SIMONS: WHY IS IT FITTING?

TITO MUNOZ: IT REQUIRES AN ENORMOUS ORCHESTRA. IT'S AN ICONIC WORK. IT'S BOTH A CROWD PLEASER, BUT CHALLENGES THE AUDIENCE AT THE SAME TIME.

TED SIMONS: WHAT DO YOU LISTEN TO IN THIS PIECE. YOU ARE LISTENING AND SOME OF IT'S FAMILIAR, SOME NOT. IT'S NOT ROMANTIC MUSIC. WHAT ARE YOU LISTENING TO?

TITO MUNOZ: IT'S SUPPOSED TO JAR YOUR SENSIBILITIES. YOU SIT BACK AND TAKE IT IN.

TED SIMONS: LET ME ASK ANOTHER WAY, WHY IS IT CONSIDERED A BIGGIE?

TITO MUNOZ: IT WAS A NEW CREATION. HE OFTEN THOUGHT HE WAS GETTING INSPIRED BY A DEITY BECAUSE IT'S INCREDIBLY DIFFERENT LANGUAGE OF WRITING AND RHYTHM AND ALL OF THESE THINGS. HE WAS PUSHING THE GAMUT.

TED SIMONS: IS IT DIFFICULT TO PERFORM?

TITO MUNOZ: FOR THE ARTIST, IT IS.

TED SIMONS: WHY?

TITO MUNOZ: IT'S DIFFICULT TO PERFORM ORGANICALLY. NOW IT'S PART OF THE REPERTOIRE.

TED SIMONS: BUT IT'S SPICEY CAKE.

TITO MUNOZ: IT IS.

TED SIMONS: 70 YEARS. IMPRESSIVE, HUH?

JIM WARD: IT'S VERY IMPRESSIVE. IT'S IMPRESSIVE FOR ANY ORGANIZATION AND PARTICULARLY FOR A NONPROFIT ARTS ORGANIZATION HERE IN THE CITY OF PHOENIX NOT OLD OF ITSELF. IT'S A GREAT MILESTONE.

TED SIMONS: WHAT IS THE STATE OF THE PHOENIX SYMPHONY NOW?

JIM WARD: IT'S DOING VERY WELL THANKS TO MAESTRO MUNOZ. WE CELEBRATED THE HIGHEST ATTENDANCE IN THE HISTORY OF THE SYMPHONY. HIGHEST TICKET SALES AS WELL. WE ARE GETTING A LOT OF COMMUNITY SUPPORT TO COME OUT TO SEE TITO'S AMAZING PERFORMING.

TED SIMONS: WE HEAR ABOUT THE DEATH OF CLASSIC MUSIC. WHY IS IT SUCCEEDING?

JIM WARD: THERE HAS BEEN THE CALL FOR THE DEATH OF CLASSICAL MUSIC FOR 50 YEARS. THAT'S BASICALLY A RED HERRING. TITO TALK ABOUT THIS ALL THE TIME. THE IMPORTANT ISSUE IS THAT PEOPLE DO ENJOY CLASSICAL MUSIC. THE REAL ISSUE IS HOW WE SERVE THAT UP, CHANGE THE WAY WE PRESENT THAT. WE HAVE DONE A NUMBER OF THINGS TO DO THAT. WE ALSO ROUND OUT AS WELL, GREAT POPS PROGRAMMING, SPECIALS ONE OFF SHOWS AS WELL. WE HAVE BEEN ABLE TO EVOLVE TO REALLY PROVIDE SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE HERE IN THE COMMUNITY.

TED SIMONS: HOW DO YOU WORK THE DYNAMIC, FAMILIAR WITH NOT FAMILIAR, WITH THE DIFFICULT, WITH THE "EASY" HOW DO YOU WORK THE BALANCE?

TITO MUNOZ: FOR ME, IT HASN'T BEEN TOO MUCH OF A CHALLENGE IN THE SENSE THAT I THINK THAT THERE IS ALWAYS SOMETHING TO GRASP IN ALMOST EVERY PROGRAM WE PRESENT. I LIKE TO THINK MY TASTES ARE ECLECTIC BUT AT THE SAME TIME ACCESSIBLE. EVEN IN THE CLASSICS, WE OFFER THE GREAT HITS, TOP 40, SO TO SPEAK. I LIKE TO THROW IN NEW THINGS. I THINK A LOT OF THE AUDIENCE GETS THAT.

TED SIMONS: DO YOU GET THE I WANT BEETHOVEN AND I WANT IT ALL THE TIME.

TITO MUNOZ: TWO THINGS, YOU CAN'T MAKE EVERYONE HAPPY ALL THE TIME, BUT BEETHOVEN WAS ONCE NEW. IF WE DON'T TRY TO FOSTER NEW ART, WE ARE NOT DOING A SERVICE TO OUR ART FORM.

TED SIMONS: HOW DO YOU CONVINCE THE PERSON THAT WANTS TO HEAR MOZART -- FOR THEM, THE RITE OF SPRING IS TOO DIFFICULT.

JIM WARD: WE OFFER THAT. THOSE THAT WANT BEETHOVEN WILL GET IT. TITO IS PROGRAMMING FOUR AND NINE AND THAT TYPE OF THING. JUST LIKE TRYING A NEW FOOD, SOMETIMES YOU SQUEEZE AN APPETIZER IN THERE. THAT'S WHAT TITO DOES. YOU WOULDN'T KNOW YOU LIKE CHOCOLATE UNTIL YOU TRIED IT. WHAT WE FIND, SURPRISINGLY, OR MAYBE NOT SURPRISINGLY, PEOPLE WITH A STANDOFF ATTITUDE TOWARD NEW, YOUNG AMERICAN COMPOSERS THAT TITO PROGRAMS, COME OUT OF THAT EXPERIENCE LIKE I NEVER WOULD HAVE GRAVITATED TOWARD THAT. I'M SO GLAD TITO CONDUCTED THAT BECAUSE IT WAS AN AMAZING EXPERIENCE.

TED SIMONS: THAT'S AN AMAZING POINT. HOW DO YOU FIND -- I'M SURE THERE ARE COMPOSURES HAPPENING ALL THE TIME. HOW DO YOU FIND THE GOOD ONES?

TITO MUNOZ: YOU DON'T ALWAYS KNOW IF IT'S GOOD. ONE OF MY MENTORS SAID, YOU DON'T KNOW BUT YOU HAVE TO TRY OR YOU ARE NOT EVOLVING THE ART FORM.

TED SIMONS: ARE YOU SETTLING IN? PHOENIX HOME YET?

TITO MUNOZ: I'M GETTING USED TO THE HEAT, BUT IT'S FEELING LIKE HOME.

TITO MUNOZ: AND THE AUDIENCE MUSICIANS, DO THEY HAVE LIKE HOME TO YOU?

TITO MUNOZ: WITHOUT A DOUBT. EVERY YEAR WE GROW STRONGER, MORE TOGETHER AND THEY ARE LEARNING MY LANGUAGE OF COMMUNICATION.

TED SIMONS: WE HAD YOU ON WHEN YOU FIRST TOOK OVER. ARE YOU SETTLED IN? DO YOU NOW SEE THE GREAT PICTURE AND WHERE THE PICTURE NEEDS TO GO?

JIM WARD: ABSOLUTELY, TED. I'M PROUD OF WHAT WE HAVE BEEN ABLE TO ACCOMPLISH IN THE SYMPHONY. WE ARE THE LARGEST ART ORGANIZATION. A COUPLE OF WEEKS AGO, I UNVEILED WITH MAYOR STANTON AN ECONOMIC IMPACT ON THE CITY OF PHOENIX. THE ARTS IMPACT $4 MILLION EVERY YEAR, ON PAR WITH THE SUPERBOWL, GREATER THAN THE BOWL GAMES, GREATER THAN SPRING TRAINING AND THE GOLF TOURNAMENT. THE SUPERBOWL COMES EVERY FIVE TO SEVEN YEARS. WE ARE PROUD TO BE THE LEADER OF THE ART ORGANIZATIONS TO MAKE OUR CITY THE BEST PLACE TO LIVE AND WORK IF WE CAN.

TED SIMONS: QUICKLY, WE SHOULD MENTION COMMUNITY OUTREACH AS PART OF THE MISSION.

JIM WARD: A BIG PART OF THE MISSION. WE HAVE A GOAL TO EDUCATE THE NEXT GENERATION OF WORKFORCE TO EXPAND ECONOMICALLY PROGRAMS, THE ONLY ONE IN THE WORLD NATIONALLY DOING ANYTHING LIKE THAT. THAT ALL RESTS ON TITO'S LEADERSHIP AND OUR MUSICIANS WILLING TO GO OUT INTO THE COMMUNITY.

TED SIMONS: IF YOU ARE GOING TO SEE RITE OF SPRING, NO THROWING THINGS, NO RIOTS, CORRECT?

TITO MUNOZ: LET THE MUSIC MOVE YOU. WHY NOT?

TED SIMONS: GOOD LUCK ON THIS SEASON. GOOD TO SEE YOU BOTH AGAIN. THANK YOU SO MUCH.
OSCAR URREA: THIS HERE, MY BROTHER AND NEPHEW AND GRANDFATHER.

MIKE SAUCEDA: OSCAR NOW LIVES IN PHOENIX. HE CAN TRACE HIS FAMILY'S MILITARY ROOTS HUNDREDS OF YEARS BACK TO SPAIN. THE SMALL ARIZONA TOWN HE WAS RAISED WAS SEGREGATED BUT RARELY WAS RACISM FELT.

OSCAR URREA: IT WAS OUR MAY BERRY. EVERYONE GOT ALONG WELL. I NEVER, HONESTLY, I NEVER -- BECAUSE I MINGLE WITH ALL OF THE DIFFERENT RACES. I NEVER FELT ANY PREJUDICE FROM ANYBODY.
MIKE SAUCEDA: HE AND TWO BROTHERS PUT THEIR LIVES ON THE LINE IN VIETNAM SERVING IN THE ARMY PROVIDING CRITICAL COMMUNICATIONS ON THE FRONT LINES, WORKING AS A CRIPTOLOGIST.

OSCAR URREA: I WAS INVOLVED IN SEVERAL FIRE FIGHTS. THE ONES I REMEMBER THE BEST, WE WERE IN CAMBODIA AND THAT INVASION.

MIKE SAUCEDA: THAT WAS -- THAT WAS QUITE AN ADVENTURE GOING IN THERE. THE OTHER ONE, THE LAST ONE I WAS IN, PRETTY FAMOUS ONE WAS 719-719. THAT WAS UP NEAR THE DMZ AND LA OCEAN BORDER. ROUGH. ROUGH TIMES.

OSCAR URREA: LET ME SEE.

MIKE SAUCEDA: ONE OF HIS PASS TIMES NOW IS SCULPTING. DESPITE TWO BROTHERS SERVING, HE FELT A PATRIOTIC DUTY TO SERVE HIS COUNTRY. WITH A SMAG TOWN UPBRINGING PROVIDING A WARRIOR ATTITUDE IN BATTLE. HE SAID ALL OF THOSE THAT HE SERVED WITH, REGARDLESS OF RACE OR ETHNICITY, SERVED AS A BAND OF BROTHERS. OFF DUTY IT WAS DIFFERENT.

OSCAR URREA: YOU HAD THE COUNTRY WESTERN GUYS, THE RED NECKS, AND EVERYONE ELSE WAS IN THE OTHER CATEGORY, THE HIPPY, LATINOS, NATIVES -- THEY WERE SEPARATED. AFTER THAT WAS OVER, THREE DAYS, YOU GEAR UP, YOU ARE CARRYING 80 OR 90-POUNDS OF GEAR. YOU JUMP INTO THE HELICOPTER, AND OFF YOU GO FOR ANOTHER FIGHT.

MIKE SAUCEDA: BUT HE NEVER FELT MISTREATED BECAUSE OF HIS ETHNICITY.

OSCAR URREA: AS LONG AS YOU WERE A GOOD SOLDIER, THEY TREATED YOU GOOD. ALL OF THE SOLDIERS I SERVED WITH, I WAS TREATED FAIRLY. I WAS TREATED GOOD.

MIKE SAUCEDA: ROBERT HERNANDEZ AT HIS OFFICE, AMERICAN LEGION 41 IN PHOENIX WHERE HE'S THE HISTORIAN. HE WAS BORN AND RAISED IN PHOENIX, A GYMNASTIC SCHOLARSHIP, LACK OF A COACH ENDED THAT, CAME HOME AND HAD BAD PREDICAMENTS THAT LANDED HIM IN FRONT OF A JUDGE.

ROBERT HERNANDEZ: I WAS ASKED WHY I CHOSE AIR FORCE, MY WHOLE FAMILY MARINES OR ARMY. TO BE HONEST, I CAN'T RECALL WHY. THE ONLY THING I CAN THINK OF, IT WAS THE CLOSEST RECRUITING CENTER TO THE COURTHOUSE. WHEN I WALKED OUT, I SIGNED UP. I HAVE TO ADMIT IT WAS THE BEST MISTAKE I EVER MADE.

MIKE SAUCEDA: HERNANDEZ WENT ON TO SERVE 30 YEARS IN THE GUARD AND DID A TOUR IN THE MILITARY.

ROBERT HERNANDEZ: I RECALL WE WOULD BE PLACED IN SERVICE TRUCKS TO GET ASSIGNED TO PLANES TO WORK ON THEM. THEY GOT UPSET WITH US SPEAKING SPANISH. THEY WOULD TELL US, YOU ARE IN THE UNITED STATES. DON'T SPEAK THAT. WE GOT REPRIMANDED FOR THAT. WE NEVER GAVE IT THAT MUCH VALUE. IT DIDN'T BOTHER US MUCH.

PETE ROSALES: WE ARE ASSEMBLED TO PAY A LASTING RESPECT.

PETE ROSALES WEARS A UNIFORM GIVING VETERANS A LAST SOLUTE IN THE MEMORIAL CEMETERY IN PHOENIX. HE SERVED UNTIL 2002. HE SERVED AS A BATTLE SCOUT WORKING WITH NAVAJO CODE TALKS. HE SAW BATTLE MOST OF US SEE ON THE SCREEN.

PETE ROSALES: MY FRIEND GOT KILLED RIGHT ABOUT WHERE YOU ARE. HE GOT SHOT ON A RICOCHET, HIT RIGHT INTO HIS CHEST, CAME OUT THE OTHER SIDE. HE SAID PETE, I'M HIT. I THOUGHT IT WAS LIKE IN THE MOVIES. HE WILL BE ALL RIGHT, BUT WHEN I SAW BUBBLES COMING OUT OF HIS CHEST, I KNEW THERE WAS NOTHING I COULD DO FOR HIM. I FOUGHT MY WAY OUT OF THAT UNTIL I RAN OUT OF AMMUNITION. I STARTED THROWING HAND GRENADES. THE LAST HAND GRENADE MUST HAVE HIT THE SPOT BECAUSE THE FIRING STOPPED. I PICKED HIM UP AND ALL OF MY GEAR AND RAN BACK ACROSS A RICE PATTY, AND OF COURSE, WE CALLED IN A BIGGER FORCE, A GREATER FORCE. THEY CAME IN AND NEUTRALIZED THE LITTLE VILLAGE.

MIKE SAUCEDA: HE SAYS HE DIDN'T SEE MUCH IN THE WAY OF RACISM IN THE WAY OF THE MARINES.

PETE ROSALES: THE DEDICATION TO AMERICA AND THE CORP., ALL INTO ONE MELTING POT. THAT MADE THE MARINE, AT THAT TIME. MADE THE MARINE SO STRONG, SO EFFICIENT BECAUSE IT'S ALL ONE WORKING MACHINE. IT'S ALL ONE -- IT'S NOT FIGHTING AGAINST EACH OTHER, NOT FIGHTING PROTESTERS IN THE UNITED STATES. WE WERE ALWAYS TOGETHER.

MIKE SAUCEDA: THIS STORY WILL BE INCLUDED IN A DOCUMENTARY THAT WILL AIR THIS WEEKEND ON ARIZONA PBS. VIETNAM, ARIZONA STOREYS WILL BE BROADCAST AT 10:00 P.M. ON SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17TH. THAT'S IMMEDIATELY AFTER THE PREMIER OF KEN BURNS SERIES ON THE VIETNAM WAR. TUESDAY, ON "ARIZONA HORIZON," IT'S AN INFOCUS SPECIAL, A ONE-ON-ONE INTERVIEW WITH ERIC WINE MAYOR. THE FIRST BLIND MAN TO CLIMB MOUNT EVEREST.

The Phoenix Symphony kicks off its 70th anniversary this year with Igor Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring,” a fan favorite that will allow the Symphony to showcase its full orchestra.

Phoenix Symphony’s Music Director Tito Muñoz says it makes a good opening piece, as it is “a crowd-pleaser [that] also challenges the audience at the same time.” “The Rite of Spring” is known for its unorthodox rhythm that has made it a challenge for orchestras to perform since it first came out more than a century ago.

The Phoenix Symphony plays the major hits of classical music, but Muñoz adds in some newer pieces as well, as he believes it’s important to promote new art. Phoenix Symphony CEO Jim Ward says that while some lament the death of classical music, he sees no signs of it going away anytime soon. Last season marked the highest attendance in the symphony’s history.

“In effect, the arts deliver a Super Bowl, year in and year out, to the city of Phoenix,” said Ward.

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In this segment:

Tito Muñoz, Phoenix Symphony’s Music Director
Jim Ward CEO, Phoenix Symphony

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