Fears of planet-killing supervolcanoes premature, says ASU expert

Headlines such as Uproxx’s, “Is The Yellowstone Supervolcano Really Going To Kill Us All?” are little more than sensationalizing scientific findings, according to one expert.

Christy Till, an assistant professor at Arizona State University’s School of Earth and Space Exploration, says the possibility of a volcano destroying life on earth is very small. “We don’t have strong evidence that’s ever happened in the past,” says Till, “and we don’t have reason to believe that’s going to happen anytime in the near future.”

Still, Till says one of the reasons she and her fellow scientists study super volcanoes is so we’ll be better able to predict if a super explosion is imminent.

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Christy Till: Assistant Professor, Arizona State University's School of Earth and Space Exploration

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