Bill Bryson

Bill Bryson was born in Des Moines, Iowa and attended Drake University for two years before he dropped out in 1972.

He moved to Britain in 1973, where he met his wife and worked as a journalist for a couple of years.

While living in England, he moved for a brief time to the United States to finish his college degree.

In 1995, he moved back to the United States and lived in New Hampshire.

He has written several bestselling novels ranging from travel books, to books about the history of science and even language books.

He won the Royal Society’s Aventis Prize, the Descartes Prize and the European Union’s highest literary award for his novel, A Short History of Nearly Everything.

Also, his novel The Lost Continent, A Walk in the Woods and Notes from a Small Island was voted the book that best represents Britain.

Aside from his literature accomplishments, he was appointed chancellor of Durham University in 2005, received the President’s Award from the Royal Society of Chemistry in 2005, received the key to the city in Des Moines, Iowa and was elected an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society in 2013, becoming the first non-Briton to be given the honor.

Sponsor message:

One Summer: America, 1927" was featured on Books & Co. on May 9, 2014.

Sponsor message:

Sign up to receive the Arizona PBS Insider

Get up-to-the-minute information about your favorite programs and learn more about Arizona PBS news and events.

Meet the new vicar on season 4 of "Grantchester"

Grantchester season 4

Tom Brittney is joining the cast as Reverend Will Davenport — man of the people and crime-solving partner to Robson Green’s Geordie Keating in 1950s Grantchester.

Arizona talent brings new kids’ show to life

Molly of Denali

“Molly of Denali” follows feisty 10-year-old Molly Mabrary and her adventures while living with her family in the fictional village of Qyah, Alaska. The series premieres July 15 on Arizona PBS.

See how our ancestors understood the 'Ancient Skies'

Discover how centuries of knowledge, experimentation and engineering helped our ancestors understand the mysteries of space in this three-part series airing Wednesdays at 7 p.m.