La Casa Murillo

More from this show

Sounds of Cultura (SOC) showcases La Casa Murillo, which is on display at the Heard Museum. The exhibit depicts the fantasy home of Crafty Chica Kathy Cano-Murillo and her husband Patrick.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Good evening. I'm Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez in for Jose Cardenas. Tonight our economic crisis is hitting community-based organizations with increased needs for Social services, housing assistance and more. Also, a state-of-the-art campaign to increase knowledge and use of folic acid among Latinos. And in Sounds of Cultura, SOC, the work of the Crafty Chica and her husband on display here in the Valley. These stories coming up next on Horizonte.

Announcer
>> FUNDING FOR HORIZONTE IS PROVIDED BY S.R.P. S.R.P.s BUSINESS IS WATER AND POWER, BUT OUR DEDICATION DO THE COMMUNITY DOESN'T STOP THERE. SRP, DELIVERING MORE THAN POWER.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Good evening and welcome to Horizonte. More and more people and families are facing layoffs, foreclosures and hard economic times. They are looking for any assistance available. Chicanos Por La Causa is the only community-based organization in Arizona that offers a variety of outreach programs in rural and urban areas for people who need it. Joining me now to talk about how they are dealing with the needs of people in the valley is Arjelia Gomez, chief operating officer for Chicanos Por La Causa. Also here is David Adame, chief development officer for Chicanos Por La Causa. Thank you.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Let me ask you for those of you not familiar with this explain what the organization does.

Arjelia Gomez
>> Sure. Chicanos Por La Causa or CPLC as we fondly refer to it is 39 years old, will be 40 next year. We've been in Arizona and serving our community for many many years. The primary focus of our service is a Social service arena. We have services that include behavioral health. We do a domestic violence shelter, a men's substance abuse sell the center, migrant and early start, charter schools, parenting Arizona is in 14 of the 15 counties, and we also do business that is under Dave's scope of work which is the housing, property management, it's all the real estate piece of our business.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Now, David, how has the economic situation right now in the nation impacted the general Hispanic community here in the Valley?

David Adame
>> I think it's affected the Hispanic community just like the rest of the community. It's not -- we're not immune to it. And -- it's a trickle down effect from the housing crisis we're in right now, it's effecting many families coming from our -- through our doors. We offer housing counseling. It's done a 1880. Before we were primarily a pre-purchase H.U.D. agency but now it's done the flip. We're primarily working with people struggling to try to keep their homes and our business partners, banks and others that have been supporting us in this counseling area is telling us we really need to put focus on the foreclosure prevention area because it's really affecting the individuals and their families.




Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> How have the Chicanos Por La Causa been affected in terms of Latinos and families, those that are in need? How has the organization specifically been impacted by all of this?

David Adame
>> Definitely on -- I also oversee resource development for the organization. The trickle down effect, organizations such as banks merging now because of the crisis, that means I'm not getting two grants, one each from each organization or corporation I'm only getting one. So it makes the resources even more tight. And we're having to be more creative in how we raise those funds and keep all our 34 lines of business going. All these 34 lines of business are to help our community. We're trying to do innovative programs in which we try to self-generate our own revenues. We currently self-generate whether seed for services, or commercial real estate stuff we do, we're about 50% self-generated. We're trying to get that to 75% so we can build a model so we're not so dependent on government, federal government or whatever jurisdiction we're dealing with, we're trying to be creative. We're trying to work with our business partners. One example is state farm about to give us a large contribution. It's not really a contribution, it's a loan, it's an investment. And we do the value for value proposition with them, in which we find out how do our companies work together. In this case it's going to be work force development which will help our community, agent recruitment to help build their business in the Latino market. So it's not a giveaway like we do at C.L.P. it's a hand up not hand out. We try to get these creative things we're doing. We will take the fund they give us and create business opportunities for our community to lend to small businesses, help small businesses that are struggling right now, and also create commercial real estate projects that will self-generate income for us so we continue to do the Social services we need to do for our community.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> With all the work that you are doing, have you seen a great number of people in need coming through your door? And what's the physically are they asking for when it comes to assistance?

Arjelia Gomez
>> Sure. I'll share with you that our families are needy when they come to us. But what we're seeing right now, and it's really spiked over the last three months in particular, basic shelter, food. Their rent needs to be paid, utilities need to be paid, they're losing their homes, they're losing their jobs. And in this time where they're in stress, their kids are also in stress. So they're going to school a bit more stressful the so we're seeing our clients more often. Where a family we might have seen maybe once a month for a therapeutic session, we may be seeing them on a weekly basis because there's just stress in the home with families, parents, children.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> So you're treating more a family versus just individuals within a family now with everything that's happening.

Arjelia Gomez
>> Yes. Arizona has for several years now, at least five that I've been back home here, had a child and family team model. So while the child may be the primary person that's referred, our work is to do with the entire family. That's on the children's side. On the adults' side we do still see adults on individual sessions. And those sessions have increased as well because of the adults are losing their jobs and are bringing their families more to that therapeutic environment as well. So on both sides.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Is there a parallel also to the need of help for keeping the home, which you were talking about earlier and working with folks to keep their homes that are in home foreclosure?

David Adame
>> It's definitely a parallel. The home is the foundation. That's where people feel safe, they feel comfortable. And if they're struggling to try to keep that it just has a rim effect throughout the family. -- ripple effect throughout the family. There are very clear statistics that kids that have a stable home environment, a place where they live, safe place, they do better in school. And the rest of the family if they need other services that Argelia's group it has that triple effect of not having the base for the home. Home is where the heart is like people like to say.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> If you see a family coming in need, the problem is foreclosure, you know they are going to then need some kind of Social service assistance.

Arjelia Gomez
>> Exactly.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> How is the funding when it comes to one and the other? Because although you're separate services, you're still somewhat depend end on each other. And again, all of this that's happening nationally is affecting everybody and you're saying including yourself. How is it affecting each of your programs?

Arjelia Gomez
>> I'll tell you that CPLC lost about $1 million in state funding, city funding, federal funding, the whole governmental structure this fiscal year. So we've had to really be very creative about how we do our services. CPLC was built on the premise that the for profit subsidiaries which David is responsible for would help the nonprofit side of our business, our Social service side in, times of a financial stress. And so when he's not able to make money, then those dollars don't come over to me. And the partnership that we have is really about all of us working together to make sure that we can build programs and sustainable programs, economic engines as we call them, so that programs can be self-sustained, so that we can have financial viability, and we pair up as a leadership team with Edmundo -- and the 14 other leadership teams that we have to work on projects that David brings to the table which is very exciting for us.

David Adame
>> The biggest challenge we have on our side is with this economy that we're in, we're hoping that economic stimulus package still being worked out the details of it comes through. Because CPLC, we do regular mainstream development projects and business opportunities. But it's still tough. It's challenging in the credit markets right now to get those resource you need in order for us to do the self-generation to be self-sufficient. So we're hoping that stimulus package coming onboard will let the banks be a little bit more flexible and put more capital out there so we can support each other.


Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Have you had to cut any programs in the housing program that you may do or any of the Social service that you may do? Any cuts you had to do because of what's occurring right now?

Arjelia Gomez
>> Yes, we have been very fortunate. Early on Edmundo brought us -- Edmundo brought us together with the leadership team, we made decisions with taking salary cuts. The whole intent was we didn't want to hurt or lose staff, we didn't want to close programs or redoes benefits to our employees. We were able to do that. I don't know how we did it, quite frankly, but we did. I do know how we did it but it was one of those things that came together so well. We didn't have to close -- close any programs or lay off any staff. It was very important for us to be able to work that through. But we cut within our administrative structure so we could save jobs and serve our families.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Tightened up a little bit. Has the spike or need of service gone up dramatically or what that you've seen in the last several months?

Arjelia Gomez
>> I think what we're seeing, Nadine, is that acuity level, the seriousness of behavioral health illness that someone is presenting with is more severe. Families are waiting a little bit longer to get to us. They're afraid to come because they're ashamed. And it takes them longer to get to our front door.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Now, are those folks that you say are ashamed or feeling embarrassed to come and look for service, are those the kind of people that may have given or were not in a situation to ever ask for help and now have to ask for help?

Arjelia Gomez
>> Right. Our housing person down in Tucson that works for David, I was having a conversation with her and she's telling us that she's seeing realtors as clients, she's seeing retail store owners as clients now because they're losing their homes. And they're stressed when that happens. And we know that, and holidays are coming. It's an already stressful time. So I'm hopeful that all of us as community service providers in the state of Arizona -- and I know that we will -- we'll rally to the cry, take care of our families. But during this stressful time it's not just low income families it's middle income families now, too.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> And Chicanos Por La Causa has been known to always be there for the community. Do you find the spike, the great number of people coming to you is because they know they can depend on you?

David Adame
>> Definitely it's because of that. We actually did an independent study to find out what was our connection with the Latino community. And it was very clear and very evident that we were the most trusted long-time agency for the Latino community. So we're definitely seeing, even on the economic side, we have a small business lending program where community development financial institution, and we're still on that side seeing small businesses coming to us. So there's definitely a good connection with the community. And a long-time trust with the 40 years we're about to celebrate.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> We have a couple of minutes. I want to touch briefly on asking you, with that reputation that you have for helping the community and being there, are you forming any kind of bridges with any organizations to help offset maybe what you may be seeing a spike, what your community's been asking you for? Anything that can offset some of the heavy load that you're feeling right now?

Arjelia Gomez
>> Yes. There's a couple different things that happen. In the behavioral health side of things and the service delivery which is the foundation of what we do, we formed an alliance long ago. And it's the Maricopa county association of providers here in Maricopa county. And we do come together on a monthly basis. Our conversations are now really turning to the economic issue and the impact to our families. So groups like Vaya Del Sol, friendly house, ourselves we always talk to each other. So it doesn't take an economic crisis to bring us to the table. We really always talk to each other. The one thing that I wanted to just share is that as we have referred families to Saint Mary's for food boxes works we also saw the need to give back to our community. And the low rider club, the majestic car club, did a cruising for a cause a couple of weekends ago. And they each contributed a turkey or ham. We went to the park and the Saint Mary's food bank truck was there. We were able to load a lot of cans, a lot of food for the food bank because that's where we send our families. So that was a really nice thing that our community was able to give back.

David Adame
>> And on the economic development side, we are working with a network of nonprofits with the money coming down from the feds to support more foreclosure prevention that's coming down to the jurisdictions and these nonprofits are working in partnership together. How do we help the cities and the counties around the state to help put that money out in the most effective way to help the most families as possible.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Well, we thank you both and Chicanos Por La Causa for being here tonight and sharing your information. We look forward to having you again.

David Adame
>> Thank you. Appreciate it.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Chicano pop artist Patrick Murillo and Kathy Cano-Murillo who is also known as the Crafty Chica are showcasing their latest work in a valley museum, displaying a life-size creation of their fantasy home. In S.O.C. Sounds of Cultura, SOC, a look at how visual cultural pieces can create an unique setting. ¶¶[music]¶¶

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> The craftiest family in the Valley has a new home at the herd museum in Phoenix. The Crafty Chica and her husband Patrick have created an exhibit depicting the type of casa they dream of having. The exhibit is called Casa Murillo and it's essentially their home away from home.

Kathy Cano Murillo
>> Every piece I put a lot of thought into it of just wanting to make it over the top and to the fullest, the shiniest it can be. And that's always been my philosophy on life as well and what I want to teach my kids.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> It has been eight years since Crafty Chica or Kathy Cano-Murillo and Patrick have been making projects with a touch of flair. Now the herd museum has given this duo the opportunity to showcase their art. For Kathy and Patrick, this is their opportunity to create their dream home for all to see.

Kathy Cano Murillo
>> The art room really reflects where it all comes from. And I mean, these other rooms, they're like our fantasy rooms. But that art roomers that's really what our art room looks like. I mean, we have our sketches all over. It's a true reflection of what we do in reality. And to see it staged as a shadow box and part of the art exhibit it makes me feel really good.

Patrick Murillo
>> We've got all our spirit in here. When I walk into the room, I feel at home, you know, because this is like what it is like in our heads, you know, in our hearts.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Casa Murillo exhibit was designed and created by the Murillos. The unique art pieces are either embellished items or original pieces of art designed by Kathy and Patrick.

Patrick Murillo
>> If you can walk into the kitchen and feel my grandma's kitchen then I did my job. If you can walk into the living room and feel like you're in a fantasy landscape, but almost like a cartoon, you know, we did our job. We can go to the bedroom and feel I Dream Of Jeannie or go into the greater gallery. All these things, cause emotions and effect all the senses.

Kathy Cano Murillo
>> I hope that for people who say that they're not artistic or they're not crafty, they can come in here and get over 500 ideas. Because there's over 500 hand made pieces in here that we have. And so there's a place for them to start. So I hope it makes them feel happy and I hope it motivates them to go home and make something for themselves.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Casa Murillo exhibit is expected to last through the summer of 2009. And there is talk that Casa Murillo may do a national exhibit tour.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Hispanic women have a risk of 1.5 to three times higher than non-Hispanic white women to have a child affected by a birth defect. The Arizona department of health services-Arizona health disparities center, just launched a campaign to increase the importance of consuming folic acid daily during the productive years, with the message especially targeted towards Latinas. Joining me to talk about the campaign is Zipatly Mendoza, office chief for the Arizona Department of Health Services, Arizona Health Disparities Center. Thank you so much for joining us.

Zipatly Mendoza
>> Thank you for the invitation.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> And today or this week is when you certainly launch your campaign. Tell me a little bit about the importance of women taking folic acid.

Zipatly Mendoza
>> Well, it's really important that women consume folic acid, especially during reproductive age, as young as 15 if possible. Folic acid really helps reduce the having the birth defect up to 70%, a mother having a birth defect up to 70%.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Your campaign is targeted towards Latinas. Why is that? Is there a need for Latinas to either take it or they just don't take it and need to know about it, don't understand it? Why the need to target this towards Latinas?

Zipatly Mendoza
>> Well, in general Latina women specifically of Mexican American descent as well as Puerto Rican women are at the highest risk of delivering babies with birth defects. And the Latinas in general as well tend to take less multivitamins with folic acid. So it's really important to educate the women about folic acid and the possibility of reducing birth defects up to 70%. And we really look forward to the campaign will deliver that message specifically towards Latina teens which in the state of Arizona tend to have the highest rate of teen pregnancies. And so we really want to make sure that women in general are aware of folic acid and that they consume it before they are pregnant.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Now, why is it important overall to take folic acid?

Zipatly Mendoza
>> It's important to take folic acid. Actually women and men should take folic acid. But we do focus more on the women because there is the possibility of reducing birth defects up to 70%. So it's really important that women do consume folic acid before they are pregnant. That's the key is before they are pregnant.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> How did the idea of the campaign for folic acid evolve? You know, multivitamins are one thing. But folic acid specifically. How did that come up?

Zipatly Mendoza
>> Well, we're really looking at increasing the intake of multivitamin use but that multivitamin have folic acid. Most multivitamins do have folic acid. The campaign came about the recall of action that was conducted last year by the march of dimes and the mayor's office, Phil Gordon. So the action came through a year ago. In addition, the governor currently have an executive order to reduce unhealthy birth outcomes so. Those are two key factors into driving the campaign.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> And who are the partners in this campaign?

Zipatly Mendoza
>> Well, currently the part are within the department of health services, including as you mentioned the Arizona health disparities center, the women and children's health bureau, as well as U.S.D.A. nutrition and the division of behavioral health services and march of dimes. We're looking at recruiting some community partners. There have been some community organizations that have assisted us so far in collecting pre-testing surveys that will build that baseline for the campaign so that we can later go back and evaluate the effectiveness of the campaign.


Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Now, what group in specific are you targeting within Latinas for this program?

Zipatly Mendoza
>> Specifically Latinas, teens between the ages of 15 and 25. That's our main group that we are targeting for this campaign. The reason being is that Latinas in the state of Arizona do have a higher rate of teen pregnancies. So we want to make sure that they are aware that folic acid is important to take. And to also to decrease the myths that are around folic acid. There are several myths around multivitamins. So we also want to decrease those myths such as weight gain, that it makes a woman more fertile. Those are all myths that exist so we want to decrease those.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Is the campaign in English and Spanish?

Zipatly Mendoza
>> Yes, it is. It's a bilingual campaign. Our spokesperson for the campaign is a local youth band called Takame which means "to live." The band consists of four males and one female. And she's the one that really drives the campaign as the spokesperson for our campaign. So we're hoping that they will reach our target population.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Nonenglish-speaking women, how are they in knowing about folic acid? Is there a gap in there when it comes to understanding folic acid and understanding why they should take it?

Zipatly Mendoza
>> There is a gap especially among our Spanish-speaking Latinas. They tend to have a -- not to know as much about folic acid. Their awareness around it is much lower speaking.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> So how are you getting the word out?

Zipatly Mendoza
>> We're getting the word out through -- we have the website that launched earlier this week, and the Spanish version we'll launch by the end of the week. And definitely working with our community partners that have helped us with distributing service, to collect data, and working with the youth centers, community health centers that are throughout the state of Arizona. But specifically we're looking to distribute the information in Maricopa county as well as Yuma, Santa Cruz and pima counties.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> How are you currently distributing the information? You spoke of launching the website. Is there any other way that women can get that information?

Zipatly Mendoza
>> We're working with the WIC clinics. WIC clinics are funding throughout department of health services. And so the WIC clinics and departments already helping us distribute the information. And they also distribute prenatal vitamins for free at no cost. So they do not have to be enrolled in WIC. Women must meet the requirement of low income, and they are eligible to receive up to nine months' supply of folic acid.
Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> What is the ultimate goal of the campaign? I know you want to inform them, you want to encourage them to -- meaning Latinas -- to take folic acid. But what's the ultimate goal of this program?

Zipatly Mendoza
>> The ultimate goal of the program in the end of the day is to reduce the number of birth defects that are -- the number of children that are born with birth defects in the state of Arizona. Birth defects is associated with a high cost with medical attention, surgeries that come with it. So in the end of the day, really that's the key goal is to reduce the number of birth defects that are born, the number of babies that are born with birth defects. And essentially we do want to recruit more partners that distribute the message. We really are looking for more community partners, more community organizations to help us deliver the message to these women.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Now, any woman that's listening to this right now, is there a specific kind of folic acid, particular brand? Or is it just any folic acid to get your hands on and begin that process?

Zipatly Mendoza
>> Folic acid is found in many sources but definitely multivitamins that contain folic acid. Any brand. As long as you check out the label and says it has 400 micrograms of folic acid is what we're looking for women to do.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Let me ask you quickly your website to get that information.

Zipatly Mendoza
>> Yes. Our website is takemultivitamins.com. The information is there. They can learn about how much folic acid -- multivitamins should contain, fresh fruits and vegetables that contain it, fortify cereals and grains also contain folic acid. It can be found in multiple sources.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Thank you very much for the information and for at least kicking off your program right here with us on Horizonte. We appreciate it.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Thank you very much for inviting us and being able to help us.

Zipatly Mendoza
>> Thank you.

Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez
>> Due to special programming here on Eight, Horizonte will be pre-empted for the next two weeks. I'm Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez. All of us here at Horizonte and eight wish you and your family a safe thanksgiving holiday. Buenos noches.

David Adame: Chief Development Officer, Chicanos Por La Causa;

James Herriot (Nicholas Ralph), Helen Alderson (Rachel Shenton), Tristan Farnon (Callum Woodhouse). Top Line: Siegfried Farnon (Samuel West), Mrs Hall (Anna Madeley)
airs Dec. 4

All Creatures Great and Small on Masterpiece

Josh Groban on stage with crowd.
aired Nov. 25

Great Performances “Josh Groban’s Great Big Radio City Show”

AJ Odneal performs on ukelele on Playlist 48
aired Nov. 18

Singer/Songwriter AJ Odneal

Buffy Sainte-Marie
aired Nov. 22

Buffy Sainte-Marie: Carry It On

Subscribe to Arizona PBS Newsletters

STAY in touch
with azpbs.org!

Subscribe to Arizona PBS Newsletters: