AZ Senator worries how they will handle millions of ballots

Jose Cardenas talked with Democratic Senator Martin Quezada from District 29. Republicans are continuing to fight for election voting bills to pass through. Also, both caucuses sent a letter to the Board of Supervisor urging them to reconsider their decision not to appeal the judges ruling on the legislative subpoena for Maricopa County ballots and access to voting machines.

We talk to Quezada about ballot harvesting. Quezada thinks it is a scary case. He thinks it is challenging one of the aspects that are still left of the Voting Rights Act.  He talks about what section 2 of the act is all about. Quezada said they do not look like they are on the good ground because the Supreme Court seems to be “pushed further to the right.”

We also talk with Quezada about what has been going on in the state legislature. We talked about the bills proposed by Republicans currently. They say these bills are to prevent voter fraud. Quezada said these proposals could hurt many different communities of color in Arizona. He also said that Republicans are refusing to accept the reality that Arizona voted the way they did. The board of supervisors lost in the fight to challenge the subpoena to seek access to ballots. Quezada said now that the legal fight is over the Senate gets access to all of the ballots but he doesn’t think the Senate knows what to do with it or how to handle 2.1 million ballots. He said they don’t know how to keep them safe, how to keep them protected, or even how to effectively audit them.

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Senator Martin Quezada, (Democrat) District 29

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