‘Independent Lens’ tells unforgettable stories about people and history

The Emmy Award-winning anthology series featuring unforgettable people, communities and moments in history returns to Arizona PBS on Mondays at 9 p.m. starting Oct. 28.

Oct. 28: “Made in Boise”

A surprising — and booming — industry has emerged in Boise, Idaho. In this idyllic, all-American city, nurses, nail technicians, and stay-at-home mothers are choosing to become paid reproductive surrogates for people from around the world. “Made in Boise” goes inside the lives of four women as they build relationships with intended parents, prepare for the rigors of pregnancy, and navigate the mixed feelings of their own families, who struggle to understand the surrogates’ choice to risk the physical and emotional complications of carrying babies for another family.

Nov. 4: “Decade of Fire”

In the 1970s, the Bronx was on fire. Left unprotected by the city government, nearly a quarter-million people were displaced as their close-knit, multi-ethnic neighborhood burned to the ground, reducing the community to rubble. While insidious government policies caused the devastation, it was the African American and Latino residents who bore the blame. Through rich archival and home movie footage, testimonials from retired FDNY firefighters and brass, as well as Bronx historians and community organizers, “Decade of Fire” reveals the real reasons for the devastation and shows what can happen when a community chooses to fight back and reclaim their neighborhood.

Nov. 11: “The Interpreters”

More than 50,000 local interpreters helped protect U.S. troops on the ground in Iraq and Afghanistan, enabling soldiers to communicate with the local population. But those who took the job were often considered traitors. In the aftermath of war, some have been able to leave their home countries and reach safety, while others still languish in hiding and fear for their lives.

Nov. 18: “Conscience Point”

Explore how the onslaught of development in Long Island’s wealthy Hamptons has triggered a clash of values. Members of the Shinnecock Indian Nation, farmers and fishing communities seek to stop the building boom and preserve the environment.

Dec. 2: “Birth of a Movement”

Learn how D.W. Griffith’s 1915 “The Birth of a Nation” unleashed a battle still waging today about race relations and representation, and the power and influence of Hollywood.

Dec. 9: “The Witness”

In 1964, Kitty Genovese was repeatedly stabbed on a street in Queens, New York. Soon after, the media asserted that 38 neighbors watched but did nothing to help. Follow the efforts of Kitty’s brother as he re-examines his sister’s life and death.

Dec. 23: “Supergirl”

Meet Naomi, a seemingly ordinary Orthodox Jewish preteen from New Jersey whose extraordinary talent — breaking world powerlifting records — turns her into an international phenomenon in this unique coming-of-age story.

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