Free speech on college campuses

Free speech on college campuses in America has been a minefield of controversy. Appearances by controversial figures from both sides of the political aisle have been disrupted or cancelled because of protests by students. Arizona’s three universities are considered leaders in protecting First Amendment rights on its campuses, with the University of Arizona and Arizona State University earning the highest speech code rating from the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, a rating held by only 45 other institutions around the country. In that light, the Arizona Regents Cup was created, a competition and celebration of free speech that will be held for the first time this November. We hear more about the Regent’s Cup and campus free speech issues from Karrin Taylor Robson, a member of the Arizona Board of Regents and an attorney and business leader. Joining her, is ASU student Makayla Thompson, an undergraduate studying political science and communication and a public speaking mentor at CommLabASU, which helps develop public speakers.

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In this segment:

Karrin Taylor Robson, a member of the Arizona Board of Regents
ASU student Makayla Thompson, an undergraduate studying political science and communication and a public speaking mentor at CommLabASU

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